Reproductive Rights

HuffPost spoke with Dr. Diana Greene Foster about the far-reaching implications of being denied abortion care, ahead of the upcoming Supreme Court case that threatens to overturn Roe v. Wade.
Gov.-elect Glenn Youngkin (R) painted himself as a moderate on the campaign trail, but advocates are worried he's harboring more extreme views on abortion.
Just a day after the Supreme Court heard oral arguments on S.B. 8, Ohio Republicans introduced a copycat bill to ban abortion at any point in a pregnancy.
The Democratic senator from Arizona has a strong record on abortion rights, but some groups say she needs to go further and support ending the filibuster.
Taking abortion access away from female athletes will force many of them to "sacrifice their athletic aspirations and pursuits," their letter reads.
“I fully understood there could be legal consequences,” Dr. Alan Braid wrote. But he said he wanted to make certain the "blatantly unconstitutional law" is tested.
A few factors are contributing to the lack of lawsuits under Texas' new anti-abortion law so far.
Others are bombarding the site with things like Shrek porn.
These moms say their experiences with pregnancy, infertility, miscarriages, childbirth — and even parenthood — radically shaped their views on abortion rights.
The president had vowed "a whole-of-government effort" following the Supreme Court's decision to allow a restrictive abortion law in Texas to go into effect.
They control all of government, but the Senate filibuster could stop them from taking any major action.
The Supreme Court ruling declining to block an abortion ban in Texas is a huge victory for Republicans. But it's one they'd rather not talk about.
He called the ruling "an unprecedented assault on a woman’s constitutional rights."
"I had never fully understood the political reach of these abortion laws until I was fighting for my life and for the lives of my babies."
Traveling out of state for an abortion can be prohibitively expensive. Here's how easily the costs add up.
Advocates and providers worry if S.B. 8 becomes law on Sept. 1, it will become a blueprint for other red states looking to end legal abortion.
Texas wants to give individuals $10,000 if they successfully sue abortion providers and others who “aid and abet” an abortion after six weeks of pregnancy.
“I refuse to give up this platform to promote complacency and peace, when there is a war on my body and a war on my rights,” Paxton Smith said.
The amendment makes abortion essentially inaccessible for low-income women and many women of color.
Texas Gov. Greg Abbott is the latest to sign one of these laws, which doctors say are arbitrary and medically misleading.