Obituaries

The prolific lyricist behind hits including "Sweeney Todd" and "West Side Story" was 91.
The right-hander had a career-high 43 saves in 1990 for Cleveland, where he made the All-Star team three times.
“Dolphin Tale” chronicled Winter’s recovery from becoming entangled in a crab trap and the unprecedented effort to fit her with a prosthetic tail.
Calhoun played Berry's bullied son in the film, for which she became the first Black woman to win the Best Actress Oscar.
F.W. de Klerk and Nelson Mandela were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for their often-tense cooperation in moving South Africa toward democracy.
In a career that spanned seven decades, Stockwell was a supreme character actor.
The 26-year-old entertainer was known for tackling feminist issues in her songs, such as denouncing men who control their partners, and calling for female empowerment.
“Never give up” was his trademark phrase, especially for his fight for a world without nuclear weapons.
The satirist often ended his routines by inquiring: “Is there any group I haven’t offended yet?”
The actor was dubbed the seventh "Friend” by fans after he appeared in 150 episodes across the show's 10-year run.
The filmmaker fatally shot on set with a prop gun by Alec Baldwin traveled far during her 42 years.
The entrepreneur died Oct. 9 from a condition called vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.
After presiding over George W. Bush’s invasion of Iraq, in his later years Colin Powell turned his back on Republicans as his party swung to the right.
Although Powell was fully vaccinated, he had a type of blood cancer that greatly diminishes the body’s immune response
He won two World Series in 12 MLB seasons but will always be remembered for the All-Star Game collision that upended his career.
Banisadr later fled Tehran after being impeached for challenging the growing power of clerics as the nation became a theocracy.
Nicola Coughlan, Phoebe Dynevor and Shonda Rhimes paid tribute to the Netflix show's "brilliant and visionary” hair and makeup designer.
Kirk starred in films like "Old Yeller" and "Swiss Family Robinson" and came out as gay in the mid-’60s.
The groundbreaking director ushered in the “Blaxploitation” wave of the 1970s and influenced many filmmakers.
The actor was famous for playing Stanford Blatch on the hit HBO show.